Hans Rosling on population growth and climate change

marizannek:

Greece is the hardest-working country in the EU! According to Greece. And only Greece. According to Britain, Germany, Spain, Poland, and the Czech Republic, it’s the laziest country in Europe. (via Business - Derek Thompson - Europe Agrees: Greece Is the Laziest, Most Incompetent Nation in the EU - The Atlantic)
Great example of how different PERCEPTIONS can be.

Greece is the hardest-working country in the EU! According to Greece. And only Greece. According to Britain, Germany, Spain, Poland, and the Czech Republic, it’s the laziest country in Europe. (via Business - Derek Thompson - Europe Agrees: Greece Is the Laziest, Most Incompetent Nation in the EU - The Atlantic)

Great example of how different PERCEPTIONS can be.

Thinking Cities, Networked Society - Ericsson

Peter Diamandis: Abundance is our future


The problem is, the market for intelligence is now largely about providing information that makes decision makers feel better, rather than bringing true insights about risk and opportunity. Our future is now being planned by people who seem to put their emotional comfort ahead of making decisions based on real — and often uncomfortable — information. Perhaps one day, the discipline of real intelligence will return triumphantly to the world’s executive suites. Until then, high-priced providers of “strategic intelligence” are only making it harder for their clients — for all of us — to adapt by shielding them from painful truths.

Alan Moore on the Trilemma of the Digital Age. Given this year’s theme of ‘Disrupt’ Alan Moore was a wonderful addition to TEDxSheffield. @AlanSMLXL is a noted expert on disruption particularly in a nonlinear world. He’s the author of ‘Communities Dominate Brands’ and he has a new book coming out in October entitled ‘No Straight Lines’ which originally came to fame as a hugely popular talk delivered at SXSWi in Austin, TX.

Alan Moore on Straight No Lines.

Don Tapscott: Networked Intelligence

The move to lateral power (Jeremy Rifkin)

Jeremy Rifkin talks about this important observation in his new book “The Third Industrial Revolution" and in this New Statesmen piece excerpted below. The meme of ’lateral power’ is a key topic in my new, upcoming book (“From Ego to Eco” - still very much in-progress) and is an important piece of  t 20111213_rifkin_whe puzzle, going forward. How can we truly change and address the issues that are crucial to our future success… or rather, survival:) ?

One answer will certainly include the switch to more lateral and side-by-side power as has been exemplified with the Internet: peer to peer, decentral, networked, real-time. More on this very soon. Comments would be very much appreciated.


We take internet technology and transform the power grid of the world into an
energy internet
. So when millions of us are producing our own green energy on site, storing it in hydrogen, our energy internet will allow us to sell and share any extra. We become our own energy producers. We then collaborate and share that energy in the same way as we share information on social media spaces on the internet.

Do you see this vision becoming a reality?
Young people now favour lateral and side-by-side power. That’s the new politics, and it’s favourable to a third industrial revolution. [They] grew up empowered on the internet to create its own information and share it freely. They now need to create their own green energy that they share in vast continental spaces…”

How 1-Minute Intervals Can Improve Your Health - Gretchen Reynolds via NYTimes.com

futuresagency:

Researchers at McMasters University have discovered that a very different approach to physical conditioning can be as effective as conventional techniques. A ’ low volume’ version of High-Intensity Interval Training — that requires only 20 minutes workout, multiple times per week — can be nearly as effective in conditioning:

Gretchen Reynolds via NYTimes.com

This modified routine involved one minute of strenuous effort, at about 90 percent of a person’s maximum heart rate (which most of us can estimate, very roughly, by subtracting our age from 220), followed by one minute of easy recovery. The effort and recovery are repeated 10 times, for a total of 20 minutes.

This could be a tremendous breakthrough, since so many people put off exercise due to time constraints. It is also another example of new research overturning conventional — and incorrect — wisdom: in this case, the idea that the duration of exercise is strongly correlated with its benefits.

He also reports that standard climate-change mitigation tools – efficiency measures, renewable energy standards and carbon markets – are likely to drive up costs for those with the fewest resources. “Any increase in the price of carbon will bear most heavily on low-income” households, Dr. Gough writes, reflecting a “contradiction between environmental sustainability and social justice goals.”

He recommends personal carbon allowances as a first step toward addressing the problem. As unusual as the idea sounds, the British government considered the policy quite seriously in 2006. David Milliband, then environment secretary, led the initiative, announcing the need for “cumulative consistent radicalism” in the face of climate change. Two years later, the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs scrapped the plan as “an idea ahead of its time.”